CSOMA Official Statement on China’s Legalization of Domestic Trade in Tiger Bone and Rhino Horn

CSOMA Official Statement on China’s Legalization of Domestic Trade in Tiger Bone and Rhino Horn

November 5, 2018

The Chinese government recently lifted a 25-year ban on the trade of tiger bone and rhino horn from captive-bred animals for use in traditional medicine.

The decision has been condemned by wildlife conservation groups that warn that allowing such legal trade will have devastating consequences globally for the two critically endangered species. The California State Oriental Medical Association (CSOMA) is unequivocally opposed to the use of all substances derived from any endangered species in the practice of traditional Chinese herbal medicine and condemns China’s reversal of the 1993 ban that significantly curbed the demand for tiger and rhino parts and has been instrumental in conserving these iconic species in the wild.

With tiger and rhino populations facing numerous threats in the wild, the reality is that with their already perilously dwindling numbers, this decision may very well seal the fate of these two species and propel them towards extinction. This result would be a tragedy to the global community as well as a black stain on the practice of traditional Chinese medicine worldwide.

We would like to underscore that these substances are in no way necessary to the effective practice of herbal medicine. We acknowledge that there is no scientific, medical or otherwise justifiable reason to use these products medicinally in any capacity. We make no distinction between captive-raised endangered animals and those born in the wild, as both equally deserve protection. Any compromise of the protections for these animals is unconscionable and misguided. CSOMA supports the prosecution of any practitioner in the U.S. found to be trafficking or dispensing any products derived from endangered species.

We call on the Chinese government to reverse this short-sighted decision and urge all members of the Chinese medical community to maintain the integrity of traditional Chinese medicine by using only ethically sourced and humanely treated, non-endangered animal products.

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

August 24, 2017

To our Membership:

We would like to take this time to clear up any confusion about the most recent Instagram post regarding the alleged: “USC Dry Needling” in the Biokinesiology Department at the University of Southern California. There have been several posts circulating Facebook and Instagram, with pictures, videos and captions titled “Dry Needling being performed at the USC Biokinesiology Department”. There were several concerns from the acupuncture community that the students may have been needling, and or being taught acupuncture, and or dry needling instruction which is not within the scope of practice of a Physical Therapist in California.

There were several posts on the Facebook Group “Keep Acupuncture Real” with statements made that the USC students and staff were dry needling and or being taught dry needling. I would like to inform everyone that I made contact with the Director of the Kinesiology Department at USC today, Dr. Chris Powers, who provided us with some clarification on the matter.

According to Dr. Chris Powers, from the University of Southern California “ There was a demonstration of acupuncture and dry needling performed by a licensed Acupuncturist at USC. The students only observed and did not perform needling techniques on each other or any patients. This was a one-time seminar class and is not part of our standard curriculum.”

To clear up any confusion, there are currently no instructors performing, teaching or allowing students to perform dry needling and or acupuncture at the University of Southern California.

According to the California Practice Act (2015) Notwithstanding any other law, any person, other than a physician and surgeon, a dentist, or a podiatrist, who is not licensed under this article […], who practices acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body, performs any acupuncture technique or method involving the application of a needle to the human body, or directs, manages, or supervises another person in performing acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body is guilty of a misdemeanor.

At CSOMA, we take dry needling allegations and the practice of acupuncture without a license in this state very seriously, because we are dedicated to the preservation and advancement of the practice of Acupuncture, and the well-being of the general public.

If you have any questions, and or concerns please feel free to contact Tiffany Tuftee, L.Ac, President of CSOMA or Ra Adcock, L.Ac, Executive Director.

Sincerely,

Tiffany Tuftee
CSOMA President

Ra Adcock
CSOMA Executive Director

Reach us at memberservices@csomaonline.org

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

CSOMA Statement on USC Dry Needling Post

August 24, 2017

To our Membership:

We would like to take this time to clear up any confusion about the most recent Instagram post regarding the alleged: “USC Dry Needling” in the Biokinesiology Department at the University of Southern California. There have been several posts circulating Facebook and Instagram, with pictures, videos and captions titled “Dry Needling being performed at the USC Biokinesiology Department”. There were several concerns from the acupuncture community that the students may have been needling, and or being taught acupuncture, and or dry needling instruction which is not within the scope of practice of a Physical Therapist in California.

There were several posts on the Facebook Group “Keep Acupuncture Real” with statements made that the USC students and staff were dry needling and or being taught dry needling. I would like to inform everyone that I made contact with the Director of the Kinesiology Department at USC today, Dr. Chris Powers, who provided us with some clarification on the matter.

According to Dr. Chris Powers, from the University of Southern California “ There was a demonstration of acupuncture and dry needling performed by a licensed Acupuncturist at USC. The students only observed and did not perform needling techniques on each other or any patients. This was a one-time seminar class and is not part of our standard curriculum.”

To clear up any confusion, there are currently no instructors performing, teaching or allowing students to perform dry needling and or acupuncture at the University of Southern California.

According to the California Practice Act (2015) Notwithstanding any other law, any person, other than a physician and surgeon, a dentist, or a podiatrist, who is not licensed under this article […], who practices acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body, performs any acupuncture technique or method involving the application of a needle to the human body, or directs, manages, or supervises another person in performing acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body is guilty of a misdemeanor.

At CSOMA, we take dry needling allegations and the practice of acupuncture without a license in this state very seriously, because we are dedicated to the preservation and advancement of the practice of Acupuncture, and the well-being of the general public.

If you have any questions, and or concerns please feel free to contact Tiffany Tuftee, L.Ac, President of CSOMA or Ra Adcock, L.Ac, Executive Director.

Sincerely,

Tiffany Tuftee
CSOMA President

Ra Adcock
CSOMA Executive Director

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Tag: Public Statements