Public Comment on Medicare Payment Policies under the Physician Fee Schedule

Public Comment on Medicare Payment Policies under the Physician Fee Schedule

CSOMA has submitted a Public Comment regarding proposed changes in the 2021 CMS Fee schedule for CPT codes 97810-97814.

In summary, the proposed changes devalue acupuncture treatments to the point where it may not be financially feasible for Licensed Acupuncturists to serve Medicare beneficiaries and other insurance patients.

Page 286 of the Federal Register lists the proposed rule changes, stating:

“…That the RVUs for the acupuncture codes were based on a pair of crosswalks to two recently reviewed codes in the Dry Needling family…Due to the similar clinical nature of these services and their nearly identical work times, we believe that it is more accurate to propose cross walking CPT codes 97810 through 97814 to the work RVUs of the Dry Needling codes, which were finalized last year, as opposed to proposing work RVUs from 2004, which were never reviewed by CMS.”

The CMS is accepting public comments until October 5, 2020, by 5:00 PM. We encourage ALL practitioners and supporters of acupuncture to submit a public comment. Acupuncturists who do not accept insurance should also be encouraged to comment because this change will have an impact on our profession.

TO SUBMIT PUBLIC COMMENT

Please visit the ASA’s Public Comment on CY 2021 Payment Policies under the Physician Fee Schedule and follow the instructions for submitting public comment on this important issue.

CSOMA’s Public Comment on CY 2021 Payment Policies under PFS

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

August 24, 2017

To our Membership:

We would like to take this time to clear up any confusion about the most recent Instagram post regarding the alleged: “USC Dry Needling” in the Biokinesiology Department at the University of Southern California. There have been several posts circulating Facebook and Instagram, with pictures, videos and captions titled “Dry Needling being performed at the USC Biokinesiology Department”. There were several concerns from the acupuncture community that the students may have been needling, and or being taught acupuncture, and or dry needling instruction which is not within the scope of practice of a Physical Therapist in California.

There were several posts on the Facebook Group “Keep Acupuncture Real” with statements made that the USC students and staff were dry needling and or being taught dry needling. I would like to inform everyone that I made contact with the Director of the Kinesiology Department at USC today, Dr. Chris Powers, who provided us with some clarification on the matter.

According to Dr. Chris Powers, from the University of Southern California “ There was a demonstration of acupuncture and dry needling performed by a licensed Acupuncturist at USC. The students only observed and did not perform needling techniques on each other or any patients. This was a one-time seminar class and is not part of our standard curriculum.”

To clear up any confusion, there are currently no instructors performing, teaching or allowing students to perform dry needling and or acupuncture at the University of Southern California.

According to the California Practice Act (2015) Notwithstanding any other law, any person, other than a physician and surgeon, a dentist, or a podiatrist, who is not licensed under this article […], who practices acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body, performs any acupuncture technique or method involving the application of a needle to the human body, or directs, manages, or supervises another person in performing acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body is guilty of a misdemeanor.

At CSOMA, we take dry needling allegations and the practice of acupuncture without a license in this state very seriously, because we are dedicated to the preservation and advancement of the practice of Acupuncture, and the well-being of the general public.

If you have any questions, and or concerns please feel free to contact Tiffany Tuftee, L.Ac, President of CSOMA or Ra Adcock, L.Ac, Executive Director.

Sincerely,

Tiffany Tuftee
CSOMA President

Ra Adcock
CSOMA Executive Director

Reach us at memberservices@csomaonline.org

CSOMA Statement regarding “USC Dry Needling”

CSOMA Statement on USC Dry Needling Post

August 24, 2017

To our Membership:

We would like to take this time to clear up any confusion about the most recent Instagram post regarding the alleged: “USC Dry Needling” in the Biokinesiology Department at the University of Southern California. There have been several posts circulating Facebook and Instagram, with pictures, videos and captions titled “Dry Needling being performed at the USC Biokinesiology Department”. There were several concerns from the acupuncture community that the students may have been needling, and or being taught acupuncture, and or dry needling instruction which is not within the scope of practice of a Physical Therapist in California.

There were several posts on the Facebook Group “Keep Acupuncture Real” with statements made that the USC students and staff were dry needling and or being taught dry needling. I would like to inform everyone that I made contact with the Director of the Kinesiology Department at USC today, Dr. Chris Powers, who provided us with some clarification on the matter.

According to Dr. Chris Powers, from the University of Southern California “ There was a demonstration of acupuncture and dry needling performed by a licensed Acupuncturist at USC. The students only observed and did not perform needling techniques on each other or any patients. This was a one-time seminar class and is not part of our standard curriculum.”

To clear up any confusion, there are currently no instructors performing, teaching or allowing students to perform dry needling and or acupuncture at the University of Southern California.

According to the California Practice Act (2015) Notwithstanding any other law, any person, other than a physician and surgeon, a dentist, or a podiatrist, who is not licensed under this article […], who practices acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body, performs any acupuncture technique or method involving the application of a needle to the human body, or directs, manages, or supervises another person in performing acupuncture involving the application of a needle to the human body is guilty of a misdemeanor.

At CSOMA, we take dry needling allegations and the practice of acupuncture without a license in this state very seriously, because we are dedicated to the preservation and advancement of the practice of Acupuncture, and the well-being of the general public.

If you have any questions, and or concerns please feel free to contact Tiffany Tuftee, L.Ac, President of CSOMA or Ra Adcock, L.Ac, Executive Director.

Sincerely,

Tiffany Tuftee
CSOMA President

Ra Adcock
CSOMA Executive Director

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